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March 13, 2022

The Great Resignation has 53% of HR pros burned out

When it comes to the Great Resignation, employers are mainly concerned about losing talent and finding suitable replacements. Few have stopped to think about how this situation is affecting managers and HR. But HR pros aren’t immune to stress and burnout — and needing to hire in today’s labor market is a high-pressure challenge. AllVoices surveyed 400 […]

When it comes to the Great Resignation, employers are mainly concerned about losing talent and finding suitable replacements. Few have stopped to think about how this situation is affecting managers and HR.

But HR pros aren’t immune to stress and burnout — and needing to hire in today’s labor market is a high-pressure challenge.

AllVoices surveyed 400 HR pros to get a better idea of the challenges they’re facing right now and how the Great Resignation has been impacting them.

Here’s what was found.

Juggling a lot

First off, HR pros have seen a lot of departures in the past year. Almost half (48%) have seen 30% of their employees quit. Additionally, everyone surveyed lost at least one employee. No one was completely unaffected by the Great Resignation.

The majority of employees lost had been with the company for three or more years (49%). Only 18% of resigning employees were new (been there less than a year).

The top reasons employees are leaving include:

  • finding a better offer elsewhere (28.3%)
  • personal responsibilities (17.3%)
  • changing career paths (11.5%)
  • reevaluating life priorities (9.5%), and
  • wanting time off (9%).

HR isn’t always able to get these answers firsthand, though. Nearly 73% of HR pros conduct exit surveys, but the departing employee doesn’t always participate (21%) or share honest feedback (20%).

Even when HR knows what employees want, they can’t always give it. For example, 65% reported they’ve had employees ask for a raise or bonus — but if there’s no additional money, they can’t make that happen.

When retention doesn’t work, HR needs to dive into the chaotic talent pool to hire. About half of HR pros currently need to hire between 11 and 20 people!

How HR feels

Looking at these numbers and everything on HR’s plate, it’s not surprising that the survey discovered 53% of HR pros are burned out.

This is a concerning statistic, and even more concerning for employers is 48% are looking for new jobs.

While the majority of HR pros feel supported by company leaders, 23% only feel “somewhat supported,” and 14% don’t feel supported “at all.”

What’s the main culprit behind the burnout? HR pros gave their top answers:

  • implementing leadership demands (16%)
  • scheduling (13.5%)
  • retaining employees (11%)
  • workload and/or hours (7%), and
  • onboarding and training (6.5%).

This survey acts as a great reminder that employees aren’t the only ones getting burned out and quitting — HR pros are feeling the same way.

Rachel MuchaRachel writes about Human Resource management and has been a member of the HRMorning staff since 2017. She is a graduate of Ithaca College.

Article written by:  Orville Lynch, Jr.
Mr. Lynch, a member of the legendary two-time Ohio Civil Rights Hall of Fame Award winning Lynch Family. Mr. Lynch is a nationally recognized urban media executive with over 20+ years of diversity recruitment and serial entrepreneur with numerous multi-million dollar exits.

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